Unlike some aspects of the mysterious Quality Score “secret sauce,” we know that Google takes landing page relevance into account when calculating Quality Score Google has been focused on semantic search and now uses something called Latent-Semantic Indexing (LSI) in its core Hummingbird engine. Domain authority is a score (on a 100-point scale) developed by Moz that predicts how well a website will rank on search engines. Efficient content organization seeks to reduce, minimize, or eliminate unnecessary on-page elements without compromising the creator’s free expression. SEO must support the style of the content creator, not dictate it.

Use Optimized Robots.txt

If you are serious about your website, at least install Google Analytics or any other preferred statistics app. Collect data about your visitors, and find out what the customer journey on your website is. Find out what pages people like and which pages they dislike. There have been a number of debates over the years about the SEO value of having keywords in your domain URL. SEO success relies heavily on the keywords you choose to target. Outreach to webmasters should be personalized. You can list reasons why you like their brand, think your brand would partner well with them or citing articles and other content they published are great ways to make them more receptive.

Create your site navigation in HTML or CSS

If you want to achieve a higher ranking on Google and other search engines, you’ll need to get serious about search engine optimization. Write proper page titles. Not overly optimized titles targeting a gazillion keywords. No. Proper, one sentence titles that contain your brand name and your focus keyword. Go through all your pages and look at your titles. Are you making the most of your keywords? And are they as interesting as possible (and suitable)? Each page needs a unique title tag, and tags should be 65 characters or less in length. Think long term rather than short term. Short term will get you nowhere with SEO.

Figure out your audience and message

Your users need the structure to navigate through your site, to click from one page to the other. And Google uses the structure of your site in order to determine what content is important and what content is less important. Through links, search engines use robots called crawlers and spiders to skim information, collect data, catalog content and make connections based on relevant information. As spiders gather together all this information, they break down, prioritize and sort related information using a process called indexing. As search engine bots crawl and index webpages, links serve as bridges that let them reach the billions of interconnected pages on the internet. From there, search engines are able to analyze and “understand” the contents of each page. According to SEO Consultant, Gaz Hall: "For those of you wondering, “index” is another name for the database used by a search engine. So “to index” a page is to have it added to that database. In other words, Google has discovered your page."

Tailor to shoppers, not search engines

When Google demotes your page for duplicate content practices, and there’s nothing left in the way of unique content to continue ranking you for – your web pages will mostly be ignored by Google. While Google is the big dog when it comes to search engines, don’t forget about Bing. It does hold a considerable share of the search market. While focusing on user experience as we’ve advocated will work for Bing as well, you should do technical audits of your site for both search engines, to make sure you have not missed any important element. Use Google’s Mobile-Friendly and Page Speed tools to ensure your website converts the most mobile visitors possible, and make it easy to contact you from the top and bottom of every page. To fully make the most of local SEO, you need to ensure that all of your content is pointing to your target areas.